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Home > Child Custody & Divorce > Book Review

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Review

Beyond the High Road

by Amy J. L. Baker, Ph.D., and Peter R. Fine, LCSW

Parental alienation and the pitfalls of being the good parent.

There are plenty of published works that scream about the problems fathers face when the family breaks apart, and few that have any idea what to do about it.

"Beyond the High Road" is one of the precious few. Step by step, it analyzes common parental alienation situations, and one by one, presents practical suggestions and techniques for confronting both the issues and their causes.





The challenge is to face up to evil without becoming part of it. This is a little like trying to shovel out a cesspool without getting any on you. So many dads, wanting to take the moral "high road," just duck when the dung starts flying. The problem with taking a non-confrontational approach is that it leaves the aggressive parent in total control.

One common parental alienation situation that isn't mentioned is the most difficult one--allegations of abuse. Maybe that would be asking too much; effectively dealing with this topic would undoubtedly be a whole book in itself.

Yet this piece is one of the best tools any alienated parent can have. When faced with an alienating ex, there really is something you can do. And your kids will be all the better off through your action.

A $9.95 download from Amy J. L. Baker.

This review copyright (c) 2008 FatherMag.com.
All rights reserved.

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